HEADLINES / TRENDS l STATS l RESEARCH l MEDIA l PEOPLE

March/April 2017

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

B Vitamins Linked to Better Brain Health

Scientists have long known that the B-complex plays a crucial role in proper nervous system function. But now studies are starting to link specific B vitamins with specific health benefits.

For instance, Irish researchers have found a link between low vitamin B6 intake and a higher rate of cognition problems among older adults.

The study team contacted 155 people, mostly women around age 70, who had participated in an earlier vitamin B study. None showed cognitive deficits in the original investigation.

Participants who had the lowest levels of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) in their blood when the study started “were 3.5 times more likely to have a greater rate of cognitive decline” over the follow-up period, according to a study report in the journal Nutrients.

In another study, British researchers found that increasing vitamin B3 (niacin) intake might protect nerve cells in a specific form of Parkinson’s.

This study involved fruit flies bred with a mutation that mimics Parkinson’s disease, in which nerve cells are disabled or killed. The mutation disabled a gene that normally protects against malfunction of the cells’ energy-generating mitochondria.

According to results published in Biology Open, flies fed vitamin B3 had fewer faulty mitochondria than flies fed a regular diet. What’s more, the flies in the supplement group lost fewer neurons.

The body converts vitamin B3 into a substance called NAD, which is depleted when cells repair their DNA. In the British study, stopping this depletion enhanced the flies’ mobility and lifespan.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

RESOURCES


Helping Babies Sleep

 

Every parent has gone through it: Spending the night trying to help a baby find dreamland.
That’s why the Pediatric Sleep Council has launched babysleep.com, a site where bleary-eyed moms and dads can find videos featuring experts in the field as well as research and tips to help children, and their parents, get the sleep they need.

The site addresses such issues as how to get a baby to sleep through the night, how to transition a toddler to a bed and nap problems; there is also a searchable database of accredited pediatric sleep centers. The council says that the site can help parents of older children as well.

“Sleep affects every aspect of a baby’s as well as a family’s well-being,” says council chair Jodi Mindell, PhD. “We created babysleep.com to bring awareness to this common problem and provide education and resources to help.”

 


Understanding Cardiac Procedures

 

There are times when a heart condition requires surgical intervention. But the technical explanations of these often-involved procedures can be daunting for the patient.

CardioVisual is a free app that provides dozens of short videos as well as easy-to-understand information on a variety of cardiovascular conditions and treatment options.

CardioVisual is designed by a cardiologist and so emphasizes conventional treatments. But its automated videos, each under three minutes, explain complex procedures and treatments in simple terms, free of jargon. The app is available for download on iOS and Android devices.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

VISIONARIES


Lester Breslow:

Linking Longevity and Health Habits

 

No one today would seriously try to claim that an unhealthy lifestyle couldn’t shorten one’s life. But no one would have thought twice about such a statement 100 years ago, and Lester Breslow is responsible for that change in attitude.

Breslow spent seven decades as a public health pioneer before his death in 2012 at age 97. But his most notable research showed how everyday health habits such as not smoking and exercising could extend lifespan.

The North Dakota native earned his MD and public health degrees at the University of Minnesota before becoming a local health officer in that state. At a time when infectious disease was still seen as the primary threat, Breslow believed there needed to be more of a focus on disorders such as cancer and heart disease that become more prevalent as people age.

After serving with the US Army in World War II, Breslow took a public health position in California, where he conducted studies on the harmful effects of smoking that were cited in the landmark 1964 US Surgeon General’s report on the subject. However, his biggest accomplishment was establishing the Alameda County Human Population Laboratory.

Starting in 1965, Breslow’s lab asked more than 6,900 county residents about their health and habits, re-surveying the same group for up to 20 years. The lab found that adopting at least six of seven behaviors—not smoking, drinking only in moderation, sleeping seven to eight hours a night, exercising regularly, eating on a regular schedule and always eating breakfast, and maintaining a reasonable weight—could lengthen a 45-year-old’s life expectancy by 11 years compared with someone who adopted three or fewer of these habits.

According to the UCLA Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health, where Breslow served as dean from 1972 to 1980 and continued to be an active member of the faculty afterwards, even he “was shocked at the magnitude of the results.”

Search our articles:

ad

ad

adad

ad

ad
ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad