HEADLINES / TRENDS l STATS l RESEARCH l MEDIA l PEOPLE

May 2013

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Fighting Cancer: Where We Stand

THE BASICS

 

1.6 million+

Estimated number of new annual cases of cancer in the US
(excluding low-level skin cancers)


Nearly 600,000


Estimated number of deaths caused by cancer (nearly one in every four)


Breast


Most common cancer diagnosis in women, with an estimated 226,870 cases annually


Prostate


Most common cancer diagnosis in men, with an estimated 241,740 cases annually

 

THE GOOD NEWS


67%

The five-year relative survival rate between 2001 and 2007, up from 49% in 1975-77

 

2.6%

Annual decline in lung cancer deaths among men from
2004 to 2008 (0.9% decrease among women)


1.8%

Drop in cancer deaths among men between 2000 and 2008, per year

 

1.4%

Annual drop in deaths among women during that time period

 

THE BAD NEWS


7.3%

Average annual increase in thyroid cancer among women from 1998 to 2007


6.2%

Average annual increase in thyroid cancer among men during that time period


1.7%

Annual increase in rates of colorectal cancer, the third most common kind,
among adults younger than 50 since 1992

 

75%

Projected increase in cancer incidence worldwide by 2030, with 90% of
that increase among the poorest nations (The Lancet Oncology)


Source: Cancer Facts & Figures 2012, American Cancer Society

 

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

MEDIA

Reaching Past Suffering

Traumas large and small cause us to shut down, keeping the outside world at arm’s length. What’s more, emotional trauma has been linked to inflammation, a key factor in chronic disease.

Getting past life’s pains and griefs requires “practicing compassion in an intentional way...healing involves learning to be compassionate with yourself,” say Mary and Rich NurrieSterns, authors of Yoga for Emotional Trauma (New Harbinger). Their backgrounds—she as a psychotherapist and yoga teacher, he as a meditation teacher—give them solid grounding for handling this topic.

The authors explain how trauma upsets the balance between the body’s fight-or-flight urges, which makes you feel jittery, and its rest-and-digest system, the one that lets you relax. Trauma often leaves people stuck in fight-or-flight; yoga, the NurrieSterns explain, helps the mind “unstick”
and become calm. While the book includes a set of asanas, or poses (none so extreme as to be beyond a fairly fit beginner), Yoga for Emotional Trauma goes well past the yoga mat in its recommendations, which also include breathing exercises and those that encourage the reader to get past the past and pay attention to the present moment.

“Your life is your message,” write the NurrieSterns. “Let it be one of hope, for your benefit and the benefit of others.” That is the ultimate message of Yoga for Emotional Trauma.

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

 

Green Tea Compound

May Fight Alzheimer’s

An extract taken from green tea that features the polyphenol EGCG may block formation of the brain plaques seen in Alzheimer’s.

Researchers at the University of Michigan found in lab studies that EGCG was able to not only hinder the development of beta-amyloid plaques—a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease—but was also capable of breaking down abnormal protein structures that contained metals such as copper, iron and zinc. Such metal-associated amyloids are linked to Alzheimer’s as well as other neurological conditions.

Results have been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
“A lot of people are very excited about this molecule,” says lead author Mi Hee Lim, PhD, about EGCG.

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

 

CALENDAR

National Physical Fitness

& Sports Month: May 2013

THE IDEA:

Promoting the many benefits of

staying physically active


SPONSORED BY:

President’s Council

on Fitness, Sports, & Nutrition

CONTACT: www.fitness.gov

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

 

Low Vitamin D Predicts High

Breast Cancer Risk

Inadequate levels of vitamin D have been linked to a high risk of breast cancer in younger women, according to a University of California, San Diego study.

Researchers at the UCSD School of Medicine looked at blood samples that had been frozen for the Department of Defense Serum Repository as part of routine disease surveillance. Two sets of samples were analyzed, 600 from women who later developed breast cancer and 600 from women who did not.

Premenopausal women who had low levels of vitamin D in their blood were three times as likely to suffer from breast cancer as those with the highest levels. Study results have been published in the online version of Cancer Causes and Control.

“While the mechanisms by which vitamin D could prevent breast cancer are not fully understood,
this study suggests that the association with low vitamin D in the blood is strongest late in the development of the cancer,” says lead author Cedric Garland, DrPH, FACE, a professor in the school’s Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. “Based on these data, further investigation
of the role of vitamin D in reducing incidence of premenopausal breast cancer, particularly during the
late phases of its development, is warranted.”

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

RESOURCE

Guiding Stars

The Idea

A system that rates foods on their
overall nutritional content;

one star is good,
two stars is better,
three stars denotes the best value


Contact
www.guidingstars.com

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

 

Quote

 

"Unlike curing cancer or

heart disease, we already know

how to beat hunger: food"


—Mario Batali

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

Cancer Stats: Digging Deeper

Inside the ACS Numbers

 

More Good News

66%

Reduction in childhood cancer death rates over the past 40 years


3.1%

Rate at which the breast cancer death rate decreased in women decreased
in women younger than 50 from 2004 to 2008 (2.1% in women 50 and older)


2.7%

Annual colorectal cancer death rate reduction among men from
2004 to 2008 (2.5% among women)


1.9%

Rate at which the ovarian cancer death rate decreased each year from 2004 to 2008

 

But There’s Work To Do

 

173,200

Estimated number of cancer deaths caused by tobacco use; smoking accounts
for at least 30% of all cancer mortality


1/3

Estimated number of cancer deaths “related to overweight or obesity,
physical inactivity, and poor nutrition and thus could be prevented”


2 million

Skin cancers diagnosed annually; many “could be prevented by protecting skin
from intense sun exposure and avoiding indoor tanning”


1 in 8

Deaths attributable to cancer worldwide

Search our articles:

ad

ad

adad

ad

ad
ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad