HEADLINES / TRENDS l STATS l RESEARCH l MEDIA l PEOPLE

September/October 2017

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How Does Your State Like to Stay Fit?

Spin classes in Rhode Island, bodybuilding in Texas: Americans enjoy different ways of staying fit. And according to a recent survey, those activities fall into four different categories.

Cardio, which improves heart and lung function (think running, biking) is a hit in 16 states. Strength work, which includes weight training and CrossFit, is big in 25 states. Five states go for balance work such as Pilates, and the remaining four favor activities that build flexibility, such as yoga and stretching.

The graphic above comes courtesy of medicarehealthplans.com and was created using mapchart.net.


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Mom’s Sweet Tooth May

Spur Kid Allergies

That old idea of a pregnant woman eating for two may have lasting consequences: British researchers have discovered a link between maternal sugar consumption and the risk of a child developing allergies and asthma.

A study team led by London’s Queen Mary University base their findings on data taken from more than 9,000 mother-child pairs. Youngsters born to the 20% of women who ate the most sugary foods were 38% more likely to develop respiratory difficulties by the time they were seven years old. The association held even after the children’s own sugar intakes were taken into consideration.

Results were published in the European Respiratory Journal.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 8.4% of all children in the US suffer from asthma, which can cause coughing, wheezing and chest pain.

 

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NUMBERS

 

 

Food Waste = Nutrition Waste

 

40%

Estimated amount of food

wasted in the US

 

5.9

Estimated amount of wasted fiber,

daily grams per person

 

33

Grams of wasted protein

 

286

Milligrams of wasted calcium

 

Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

 

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Low Vitamin B1 Levels

May Raise Infertility Risk

 

 

W hile folic acid, part of the B vitamin family, gets all the attention for its role in preventing birth defects, another member of the B-complex may be just as vital for moms-to-be.

Deficits in vitamin B1 have been linked to fertility problems in a recent Japanese study.

The study team fed a diet deficient in B1, also known as thiamine, to two sets of mice, one for 13 days and the other for 21 days. The mice in the first group developed a mild lack of vitamin B1, which became a severe deficiency in the second group.

Mice with severe B1 deficiencies had higher percentages of abnormal oocytes, cells in the ovary that eventually become eggs. The team theorized that the presence of such cells could lead to infertility and miscarriage.

Writing in the journal Nutrition and Metabolic Insights, the team did note that numbers of abnormal oocytes “returned to the normal range by refeeding the mice with a vitamin B1-containing diet.”

Sunflower seeds and legumes (such as beans, lentils and peas) are rich sources of vitamin B1, which promotes proper energy production and a healthy nervous system.

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