HEADLINES / TRENDS l STATS l RESEARCH l MEDIA l PEOPLE

June 2010

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

M E D I A
A Diet for Every Body

Alternative medicine has long embraced the idea that there are as many paths to well-being as there are people. Because each person represents a unique mixture of genetics and environment, the thinking goes, a healing regimen must be tailored to that individual’s needs.

That belief in personalized health has been extended to matters of diet and nutrition. Each of these books looks at weight loss from a different angle—one of which may be just the approach you are looking for.

The Instinctive Dieter

The things that drive different people to eat too much are like snowflakes; it seems that no two are alike. “One food instinct may trigger me to overeat, while you may respond to another,” says nutrition professor Susan Roberts, author of The “i” Diet (Workman). Roberts discusses five basic triggers—hunger, availability, calorie density, familiarity and variety—in depth before laying out a program designed to help you stop raiding the fridge and start succeeding at weight loss.

The Starving Dieter

Thanks to the low-carb diet, some people think “carbohydrate” is a dirty word. Not true, says nutritionist Christine Avanti, author of Skinny Chicks Don’t Eat Salads (Rodale). People think of carbs in terms of fries and sweets, but “veggies, whole grains, fruits and beans are also packed with carbs,” Avanti notes. Her diet is based on eating enough healthy carbohydrates to keep your blood sugar—and your appetite—on an even keel.

The Stressed Dieter

Stress and excess weight often reinforce one another: I feel stressed, so I eat too much, so I gain weight, so I feel stressed. According to Rachel and Richard Heller, authors of The Stress Eating Cure (Rodale), the key to getting off this nasty little merry-go-round is to understand the hormonal reasons you overeat and how you can bring them under control. “Once you can acknowledge that your stress-eating may be the result of a physical disease,” say the Hellers, “you’re halfway to being free of it for good.”

The Mindful Dieter

Some people would shed pounds if only they could quiet the self-blaming chatter in their heads. If that sounds like you, Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh and Harvard researcher Lilian Cheung have good news to share in Savor (HarperOne): Mindfulness, the ability to live in the present, gives all of us “the tools to touch peace and joy...and to end our struggle with weight.”

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The High Cost of Salt


$32 Billion


Potential healthcare savings over the next decade if Americans
reduced their average daily salt intake by 1 gram

92,000

Number of deaths that could be avoided if salt intake was cut by 3 grams daily

1 in 4

People currently on blood pressure medication who could stop taking drugs

80%

Amount of salt in the US diet that comes from processed foods


Source: New England Journal of Medicine 1/20/10 online


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Mind Over Back Pain

Relief for your aching back may come from your mind, according to a British study in a recent issue of The Lancet.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is designed to change negative thought patterns. Researchers at the University of Warwick provided 701 back patients with either standard treatment—group therapy and advice on matters such as activity levels and medication use—or standard treatment plus CBT. After a year, the CBT group saw a 13.8% improvement in a test to measure disability, compared with a 5.4% improvement in the standard treatment group.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Calcium, Vitamins May Lower
Cancer Risk

Many women take calcium to help strengthen their bones. But this mineral—along with
vitamins in general—may also act to protect against breast cancer.

Scientists at the Ponce School of Medicine in Puerto Rico examined supplemental calcium and vitamin intakes in two groups of women, 268 with breast cancer and 457 healthy controls. Calcium
was associated with a 40% drop in breast cancer risk, while vitamins were associated with a 30% reduction.

The scientists say that calcium appears to help cells repair DNA; damage to this key genetic molecule can lead to cancer. The study findings were reported at this year’s annual meeting
of the American Association for Cancer Research.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Calendar

National Men’s Health Week

June 14-20

THE IDEA: Encouraging early detection and treatment of disease among men; the average man lives seven fewer years than his female counterpart

SPONSORED BY: Men’s Health Month

ACTIVITIES: A Wear Blue campaign for prostate cancer awareness, health fairs and screenings, fitness and healthy cooking demonstrations

CONTACT: www.menshealthmonth.org, 202-543-6461

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

More Vitamin K, Less Lymphoma?

Increases in vitamin K intake may reduce the risk of developing cancer of the lymphatic system, according to a study conducted by the Mayo Clinic and presented to the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

Food questionnaires were completed by 603 people with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a term that covers 29 different cancers of the lymphatic system. The researchers recruited 1,007 healthy volunteers, who were also queried about their dietary habits, to serve as controls.

The risk of developing lymphoma was found to be 45% lower among people who consumed at least 108 micrograms of vitamin K daily, compared with people with an average intake of 39 micrograms or less.

“These results are provocative,” the lead study author, James Cerhan, MD, PhD, told the AACR. “This is a fairly strong protective effect.” Cerhan noted that additional research was needed to confirm his team’s findings. The Mayo study was funded by the National Cancer Institute.

Vitamin K, long overshadowed by its more well-known cousins such as vitamins C and E, has always been associated with healthy blood because of its ability to control coagulation, the process that causes blood to clot. Vitamin K is found in a variety of green foods, including kale, spinach, collard greens and romaine lettuce.

-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Vitamin D May Boost Senior
Muscle Function

Vitamin D, a nutrient best known for boosting bone health, may help muscles, too. That’s the conclusion of a recent study that found a link between high blood levels of the sunshine vitamin and better physical functioning in seniors.

Researchers from Wake Forest University recruited 2,788 people (average age of 75) for this investigation. Vitamin D levels were measured three times: When the study started, two years later and four years later. The participants also underwent a battery of tests including those for walking speed, balance and ability to rise easily from a chair.

The people with the highest levels of vitamin D showed the greatest ease of movement. In contrast, 90% of the people with the lowest test scores were found to be D deficient.In her presentation before the Experimental Biology 2010 meeting in Anaheim, California, study lead author Denise Houston, PhD supported recent calls by the scientific community for an increase in the recommended daily intake for this crucial nutrient. “Current dietary recommendations are based primarily on vitamin D’s effects on bone health,” she said. “It is possible that higher amounts of vitamin D are needed for the preservation of muscle strength and physical function as well as other
health conditions.”

The proposed increase in vitamin D intake is supported by a growing body of research into D’s
many physiological functions. In addition to building strong bones and muscles, evidence suggests
that vitamin D also plays a role in regulating blood pressure, keeping inflammation in check, regulating the immune system, supporting brain function and quelling chronic pain.

Search our articles:

ad

ad

adad

ad

ad
ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad

ad