HEADLINES / TRENDS l STATS l RESEARCH l MEDIA l PEOPLE

July/August 2010

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What’s Your City’s
Sun Intelligence?

What seems like common sense regarding sun exposure may not be so common after all. According to the American Academy of Dermatology’s 2010 “Suntelligence” survey of adults in 26 US cities, not everyone has gotten the memo on proper summer skin protection. The
following cities ranked at the top of the survey, which measured people’s knowledge of how to prevent and detect skin cancer.

1. Hartford

2. Salt Lake City

3. Denver

4. Tampa

5. Boston

6. Phoenix

7. Atlanta

8. Philadelphia

9. Portland

10. Baltimore

 

80% Survey respondents who are concerned about skin cancer

70% Those who don’t apply sunscreen on an average day

35% Those who know there are no UV rays that are skin-safe

28% Those who never check themselves for changes in
moles and other blemishes

 

As these numbers show, skin cancer concern doesn’t always translate
into action. The AAD recommends using sunscreen whenever you
go outside, wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, and staying in
the shade between 10 am and 4 pm, when the sun’s rays are strongest.

 

Full City Rankings

The complete listing for American Academy of Dermatology’s Suntelligence
survey results are as follows:

  1. Hartford
  2. Salt Lake City
  3. Denver
  4. Tampa
  5. Boston
  6. Phoenix
  7. Atlanta
  8. Philadelphia
  9. Portland
  10. Baltimore
  11. Dallas
  12. Houston
  13. Miami
  14. San Francisco
  15. Washington, DC
  16. Detroit
  17. San Diego
  18. Cincinnati
  19. New York City
  20. Minneapolis
  21. St. Louis
  22. Los Angeles
  23. Seattle
  24. Cleveland
  25. Chicago
  26. Pittsburgh

 

To minimize sun exposure, the AAD recommends the following:

 

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Vitamin E Helps Sick Livers


More and more Americans are developing nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), liver inflammation and damage caused by excess fat deposits. There are no currently approved treatments for this
condition, also known as fatty liver disease. But there is good news: Vitamin E may help.
Researchers at the Saint Louis University Liver Center gave either 800 IU of natural vitamin E or a placebo to 247 people with NASH. After 24 months 43% of those in the vitamin E group showed significant improvement, compared with 19% in the placebo group.

New England Jnl of Medicine 5/6/10

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Lycopene May
Cut Asthma Risk

Lycopene, a beneficial flavonoid found in tomatoes and other red fruits and vegetables, has been found to inhibit inflammation linked to asthma development.

Scientists at the University of Newcastle in the UK divided mice into two groups. Mice in the first group ate a normal diet; those in the other also received lycopene. The supplemented mice showed reductions in eosinophils, white blood cells associated with an asthmatic immune response, and in inflammatory chemicals called IL-4 and IL-5.

The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry 4/12/10 online

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WORD

Estrogen

A group of hormones that help regulate the menstrual cycle. At puberty they are responsible for secondary sex characteristics such as breast growth; at menopause reduced estrogen production signals the end of a woman’s reproductive years.

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Quote

Insomnia is
my greatest
inspiration.

—Jon Stewart

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Brown Rice Helps
Fight Hypertension

Nutritionists have long recommended brown rice over the more highly refined white rice because of the brown variety’s greater fiber content. But brown rice might be even healthier than originally thought: It may help keep blood pressure under control.

Scientists examined the rice kernel’s subaleurone layer, the one between the white core and the brown outer husk. They found that nutrients extracted from this layer were able to inhibit angiotensin II, a chemical that causes blood pressure to rise, in muscle cells taken from blood-vessel walls. “Our research suggests that there is a potential ingredient in rice that may be a good starting point for looking into preventative medicine for cardiovascular diseases,” says lead researcher Satoru Eguchi, MD, PhD of Temple University School of Medicine.

2010 Experimental Biology conference

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Resveratrol May Ease Colitis

Colitis is an inflammatory disorder that can cause ulcers to develop in the bowel wall and increase the risk of colon cancer. But researchers at the University of Seville in Spain believe that resveratrol, the substance responsible for red wine’s health benefits, may help keep this painful condition in check.

These investigators gave resveratrol to a group of mice; another group, fed only standard mouse chow, served as controls. All the mice developed colitis but colon damage was not as severe or extensive in the treated group. The supplemented animals showed fewer signs of disease, such as diarrhea and weight loss. What’s more, all the mice in the resveratrol group survived; 40% of the control group did not—an important finding, according to a report published in the May issue of European Journal of Pharmacology.

Resveratrol is found not only in grapes but also in several types of berries as well as peanuts and Japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum). Best known for its ability to protect the heart by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride levels, recent research suggests that resveratrol may help suppress cancer development and prevent arthritic joint degeneration.

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UPDATE:

Interventions Help Keep
Seniors Upright

In “Fending Off Falls” (January Malady Makeover), we saw how falls can have devastating health consequences for older people but that the risk of falling can be reduced through complete checkups, lifestyle changes, regular exercise and proper nutrition. Now a British study
has found that an intensive fall-prevention program can help keep people on their feet.

A research team led by the University of Nottingham studied 204 people who had fallen and called an ambulance but were not taken to the hospital. All of them were asked to keep monthly diaries of how often they fell.

Half of the patients were enrolled in an program conducted by fall-prevention teams. The interventions included at least six strength-and-balance sessions with a physiotherapist and practice in getting up from the floor overseen by an occupational therapist. Home hazards, including poor lighting and cluttered floors, were assessed and equipment such as chair raisers and grab handles were provided. Nurses reviewed blood pressure readings and medication schedules, and participants were referred to healthcare practitioners or social service agencies as needed.

In addition, the professional teams conducted 12 group sessions on fall prevention.

The interventions made a big difference. The fall rate for the treatment group was 3.46 falls over 12 months, compared with 7.68 in the control group. The intervention group also called for an ambulance less often after a fall and were better able to participate in activities of daily living, such as dressing and bathing themselves.

“People who have fallen...but are not taken to the hospital are at a high risk of falling again,” the study team wrote in the May 11 issue of BMJ. “Immediate referral to a falls prevention rehab­ilitation service may reduce the number of further falls.”

 

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