Busy B’s

B-complex is a big family of vitamins,all of which are
essential to your well-being.

bs

October 2011

NUTRIENT FOOD SOURCES* WHAT IT DOES
Biotin Avocadoes, eggs, liver, pork, salmon, yeast Needed for proper amino acid metabolism and DNA replication; deficiency, which may not be uncommon during pregnancy, has been linked to birth defect risk, and to hair loss and problems with blood sugar regulation
Choline Beef, broccoli, brussels sprouts, eggs, liver, shrimp, wheat germ Required for production of phospholipids, found in all cell membranes, and acetylcholine, crucial to memory formation and muscle control; needed for proper fetal brain development; may have anti-inflammatory properties
Cobalamin (B12) Beef, clams, crab, mussels, salmon
Required, along with folic acid and vitamin B6, to neutralize homocysteine, associated with cardiovascular disease; deficiency linked to anemia; needed for proper brain function, including mood health; vegans at risk for deficiency
Folic Acid Asparagus, chickpeas, lentils, lima beans, orange juice, spinach Long known to help prevent birth defects, especially neural tube defects such as spina bifida; use before conception may increase baby’s birth weight; may be beneficial for people with asthma or certain kinds of depression
Inositol Bananas, cabbage, cantaloupe, liver, oranges, raisins; the inositol found in beans and grains occurs in a form that is difficult to digest Needed for proper insulin usage; may help balance body chemicals linked to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and to mood problems including depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic attacks
Niacin (B3) Chicken, salmon, tuna, turkey, yeast Helps to lower total and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, along with triglycerides (blood fats), and to raise HDL (“good”) cholesterol; has been linked to reduced risk of strokes and second heart attacks; may protect DNA against mutation
PABA Beer (unfiltered), brewer’s yeast, liver, molasses (unrefined), mushrooms, whole grains Full name, para-aminobenzoic acid; most often used topically as a sunscreen because of its ability to block harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays found in sunlight from reaching the skin
Pantothenic Acid (B5) Avocadoes, broccoli, chicken, eggs, liver, milk, sunflower seeds, sweet potatoes, yogurt Needed for the production of coenzyme A, which helps turn food into energy; has supported testicular health and sperm motility in laboratory studies; helps speed wound healing and may help the skin retain moisture
Pyridoxine (B6) Bananas, chicken, potatoes, salmon, spinach Supports healthy red blood cell production and nervous system function; low levels may lower immune response; has been linked to reduced cancer risk and inflammation, and with better pregnancy outcomes, in studies
Riboflavin (B2) Almonds, eggs, milk (nonfat), spinach Needed for the regeneration of glutathione, a key antioxidant; plays a crucial role in energy production; higher intakes associated with reduced cataract risk; may help reduce frequency and severity of migraine attacks
Thiamine (B1) Beans, brazil nuts, lentils, peas, pork (lean), sunflower seeds, tuna, yeast Required for energy production and normal development of the myelin sheaths around nerves vital to proper impulse transmission; supports healthy heart function

*Naturally occurring; some foods, especially cereals and other grain-based foods,
have B vitamins added as part of the manufacturing process

NOTE: Optimal dosages will vary from person to person. Consult a nutritionally aware
practitioner who can help you formulate an individualized supplementation plan.

 

 

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